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I Dressed Like It Was 1977

I Dressed Like It Was 1977


[ ♪ INTRO MUSIC ♪ ] Hello friends, and welcome to another video. Today, I’m gonna be dressing like we did 40 years ago, in 1977. 1977 was the year that brought us Annie Hall, the first personal Apple computer, Space Mountain, and the births of Kanye West, Shakira, and Chuck E. Cheese. From Burt Reynold’s mustache to Chewbacca’s “facial hair,” 1977 was a year of lining up to boogie at Studio 54, as well as to see Luke Skywalker destroy the Death Star for the first time ever. While ABBA was crooning about Dancing Queens and some dude named Fernando, an entire movie was being produced about Arnold Schwarzenegger’s biceps. In regards to what we were wearing, it was a year of flared pants, matching his and hers blouses, polyester everything, and all of this floofy hair. From the “Farrah flip” to the fluffy bowl cut, 70’s hair definitely had its moments. So once again, Kayley Melissa, a super talented hair stylist and YouTuber, agreed to aid me in my quest to become a foxy 70s mama. So, with some assistance and after consulting a few fashion magazines, these five hundred page JCPenney catalogs, and my mom, I think I managed to put together three outfits that echo some of the iconic looks of the time. As always, I’m going to be focusing mostly on American fashion, though as we know, ABBA was from Sweden. So, 1977: What happened, and what we wore. So for my first outfit, I whipped out the polyester and a touch of suede for a business-casual pantsuit look. My hair is floofin’ and the suede is swishin’. And we’re all just going together. This outfit was inspired by several looks from the JCPenny catalog, as well as some leading ladies from TV and film, including Mary Tyler Moore, Annie Hall, the Charlie’s Angels, and the OG Wonder Woman herself, Linda Carter. Well, her alter ego, Diana Prince. It’s not working! Not literally Wonder Woman’s super suit, but that thing is… “pretty fly.” SAFIYA: I’m not Wonder Woman.
[ TYLER LAUGHING ] – I tried! This outfit includes leather loafers, brown flared pants, this brown belt, a striped, button down shirt, a tan suede jacket, this orange ascot, and these giant glasses. These like, earthy and orange-y tones kind of make me feel like Velma from Scooby Doo. – TYLER: Oh yeah! – SAFIYA: Yes, everything is some type of brown or earth tone. The 70s color palette was very much a reaction against the bright, psychedelic colors and rainbows of the 60s. I’ve kind of got like, Velma glasses and orange Shaggy pants, and Fred ascot.
– TYLER: There’s a little bit of the whole gang. – SAFIYA: This is the “Sh- the- Shaggy Run,” he goes… – TYLER: How do you do the Velma run? – SAFIYA: Probably the same way.
They’re all animated exactly the same. – TYLER: They’re all kind of like, leaning over.
– SAFIYA: And like, leaning forward. – This outfit could work for an undercover agent, or as office wear, but variations of this pants and blouse outfit seemed to be everywhere, as pants became more mainstream as women’s wear. – TYLER: You kind of look like you’re someone from Argo. – Mmm, like an embassador. – TYLER: Hanging out with Ben Affleck.
– Mm, not that part. – As little as 10 years earlier, women wearing pants in everyday business or formal settings was not exactly socially acceptable. But in the late 60s and early 70s, many women began wearing more unisex, less typically feminine clothing, and by the late 70s, pants were everywhere. In denim, polyester, and attached to halter tops in disco jumpsuits. These aren’t bell bottoms, they’re more like bootcut flares, but like… I am going to the office, I’m not going to the disco… quite yet. This entire look was also worn by guys too. Flared pants, loafers and wide lapel shirts were popular amongst everyone. And so was this wavy hairstyle with side swept bangs. – Today, I’m going to make you look like my mom in high school. She had these long, flippy bangs, and basically everything was curled out away from the face. So I’m going to get your hair to have as much fluffiness as I can, and then we’re using another toupee. – SAFIYA: Couldn’t go another video without another toupee. – KAYLEY: No, we need the toupees. They’re important. – SAFIYA: For my makeup, I went with gold and bronze eyeshadow, mascara, a bit of blush, and a neutral lip color. I’m not too sure about the eyebrows – I think I might have too much eyebrow for the 70s, but the glasses mostly conceal those, so that’s good. This outfit really does make me feel like I’m some type of investigative reporter. See, this is why you wore earth tones as a detective. You just… you blend right in with the fall foliage. – TYLER: Oh, you’re trying to blend in?
[LAUGHING] That was your detective move? Who are you investigating right now? – You. – TYLER: Me? – Yes, that’s what I said. You, dammit. I think maybe it’s the glasses, or the old camera that I found. – TYLER: Can I help you? [LAUGHING] You’re under arrest.
– You’re under arrest! But regardless, it was fun. And I would definitely wear this ascot again. Now that I’ve double knotted it, it’s never coming off. – TYLER: Snip it off. – SAFIYA: Leave my ascot alone! For my second outfit, I threw on a leather jacket and stuck some safety pins in my ears for this punk street fashion look. I think I’m like trying to figure out like, how angry I should be. – TYLER: You have to be mad there’s any form of government at all! – SAFIYA: In 1977, the punk movement was growing concurrently in New York and in London, led by major music acts such as The Ramones, Blondie, The Sex Pistols, and The Clash. If you’re an American punk, you do this. But if you’re a British punk, you do this. – TYLER: Rude! – I don’t know if you can do it with both hands. Actually, I don’t know which hand it is. – TYLER: Isn’t it your like, bow hand? – I think it’s this one. – TYLER: When was the last time you shot an arrow? – Never.
[ BOTH LAUGH ] Though punks on different sides of the pond had slightly different styles, the underlining ideology was mostly the same: Mainstream music sucked, mainstream politics sucked, hippies sucked, and maybe we should give… Anarchy a chance. – TYLER: At this stage, you’re basically angry at the Greeks. – Yeah, exactly. It’s like, “How dare you create democracy?!” [ TYLER LAUGHS ] – Who created currency? They’re next. – TYLER: How do we exchange goods? – We exchange pins.
– TYLER: Oh, okay. – I guess that’s currency, damn it, it’s hard to function without it. – TYLER: [LAUGHING] That’s the definition of currency. – SAFIYA: For this outfit, I chose these chunky soled combat boots, fishnet stockings, a distressed plaid skirt, this Sex Pistols T-shirt, this black leather moto jacket, a dog collar necklace, and as I mentioned before, a few strategic safety pins and band pins. Maybe it was like, how many shows you had went to, or just like, how many bands you wanted to “rep.” It’s almost like a boy scout badge.
– TYLER: Yeah! – “Punk scouts.” And for my makeup, I was inspired by Siouxsie Sioux (“Susie Sue”) and the Banshees, who was a major style icon of the London punk scene. Punk fashion and music leaned heavily on nostalgia for 1950s Rock ‘n’ Roll, bringing back elements like the Greasers’ leather motorcycle jackets, and straight-leg denim jeans. But this time, they were distressed and repurposed. Almost as if the punks had dragged them out of their proverbial grave. [ BADLY GROWL-SINGING ]
♪ I am an Anarchist! ♪ [TYLER LAUGHS] I feel like I really look the part, but I’m not doing so good at acting the part. [TYLER LAUGHS]
– Yeah! That’s hardcore! In general, the aesthetic of punk was all about shock value. Facial piercings of many varieties, bold makeup, vertical hair, ripped pants, plaid pants, no pants, and an abundance of metal chains. Though some commonalities emerged, the general style theme was “DIY, or go naked.” I need to take one of these off and make it an earring. – TYLER: How much do you feel your hair in the wind? – I can feel it… it feels like a giant cotton ball. – TYLER: [LAUGING] It looks like a giant cotton ball. – SAFIYA: This hairstyle in particular is inspired by images of women attending punk music shows, as well as everyday street looks. – Yes, my goal is to make you several inches taller today. I’m doing a wig first so that I can get the hair slightly shorter to give me a better chance of fully defying gravity. TYLER: How much gel did you put in this thing already, Kaylee? – All the gel I had. KAYLEE & SAFIYA: All the gel! and though many punks had shorter hair it seems like longer hair could also be styled straight up or in some kind of orb around your head. Like the 80’s hair is kind of like ‘restoration England’ and this one is kind of like ‘pre-revolution France.’ It’s like a very counter-culture twist on rococo. TYLER: Yeah. – I agree. Oh, good I like that attitude. Just slam it shut! Thought it was new in the 70’s, the punk aesthetic is a pretty timeless counter-culture look. Something that is kind of interesting to me is how similar this look is to my 2007 like emo/scene look. Like I just feel like I’m the mom. I’m just like dropping out emo babies left and right. Most people avoided me in this outfit. Sugar, spice, everything nice. But besides that, I did very much enjoy kicking stuff with my fixled combat boots Consider yourself lucky, that could’ve been your shin. TYLER: Yeah, don’t kick me. And headbanging in Hot Topic. I was so nervous to headbang because I thought that it would get rid of all the height But maybe in fact that’s what it needs. Tyler: Oh yeah It needs to just be like, whipped around kinda. Tyler: That’s what you do by yourself. Yeah, exactly. You just put all the gel in it and you just almost put it in a blender. You’re like…(whips hair around) A place that no doubt many old school punks would not frequent, but they arguably helped build. For my final outfit, I jumpsuited up for a night on the town disco look. It is a little before dusk, so it is a little early for disco fever, but the sun shall soon be setting. The 1970s going out look traded in the miniskirts of the 60s for full length dresses, flared pants and jeans, and other easy to groove in garb. I feel like this outfit is very much made for dancing, but not necessarily for going to the bathroom. And not really for much else. For this outfit, I’m wearing a black jumpsuit with a halter-top, flared leg and tear drop shape cut outs, a gold brooch, golden dancing sandals, a gold purse and these golden black accessories inspired by disco icons like Donna Summer, Diana Ross and a little bit of the Bee Gees. I don’t know what I’m doing, I lost the beat! For my makeup I chose this bright blue eyeshadow, blush, and lipgloss. Think I’ve already eaten my lipgloss off… But the eyshadow’s still there, I haven’t eaten that yet! Tyler: No! For my hair, we went for the full Farrah flip. My hair is fauceting away. Just like a fountain that is being released from a faucet. I’m just trying to work Farrah Fawcett in there somewhere, it’s really not… TYLER: It’s…no it’s coming across. – Ok, there you go! Farrah Fawcett, a Charlie’s Angel and style icon, had a very specific wide layered look. But in general for disco hair, the bigger and curlier, the better. For this look, Kayley found a full diagram on how to get the exact Farrah flip, from the curls, to the wings, to the feathery, feathery bangs. I’m not exactly sure what types of moves I should be doing, I feel like the only one I really know is this one: TYLER: Yeah, its classic. – This feels right. This one feels like, I’m groovin. To the windows! To the wall, to the wall To the sweat dripping down my… Although discos were known for their ‘anything goes’ mentality, dance by yourself, dance naked, ride a white horse, tonight I decided to go out with a disco partner. For Tyler’s outfit, we went full John Travolta. TYLER: “Hey, will you watch the hair?” SAFIYA: From the hair, to the red blouse, to the flared pants all the way down to the super tall platform dancing shoes and all the way back up to the exposed chest hair. – Tyler, what are you eating? – I have no idea. [laughs] It’s good. It’s like a giant Twinkie. We couldn’t find a real disco club nearby, but there was a roller disco that was open on a Monday night. So, we went to go try out some of our moves. It’s time to boogie! TYLER: [Laughs] The disco scene was going strong in 1977 with the opening of Studio 54 in New York, and the massive success of the movie ‘Saturday Night Fever’. But a few short years earlier, it was more of an underground movement. Disco finds its roots in the gay club scene of New York in the late 1960s. Originally, as a place where many people from different marginalized communities would get together and dance it out. But by the end of the decade, disco became mainstream. In growing to be a $4 billion industry with over 10,000 discotecs open across America by 1978. The roller disco in particular, was an emblem of the late 70s. It seems like rollerskating in general became popular and so, we all had the idea that bringing the two together would be a match made in heaven. Regardless, it was the closest we could find to a true disco club as well as a great place to showcase me almost falling on my ass multiple times. And, there was a disco ball. So, I think it counts. – I didn’t do that great but–
– You didn’t fall. – Exactly, I didn’t fall. TYLER: We got some good dancin’ in there.
SAFIYA: Yeah, exactly. I would definitely do this again, I would come back for sure. TYLER: Yeah. SAFIYA: So those were my 1977 outfits. An additional bonus outfit that I have been wearing the entire time is this jumpsuit that my mom bought and believes she wore in 1977. She and my grandma also sent a couple of other outfits that they believe are late 70s and maybe early 80s. Overall, I really enjoyed styling outfits around the 1977 aesthetic. Of all the things in these looks, there definitely is some stuff that’s in style today. To be honest, the punk outfit is something that people would and do wear pretty much from head-to-toe today. And I also think that a lot of retailers are referencing the 70s in their fall and winter clothing lines. For me, I’d like to bring back the ascot. I was walking with so much purpose, my ascot just blew open. And also the roller skates. I wasn’t very good at it, but I feel like I could get better. And again, I could always use more chest hair from Tyler. I do like the John Travolta hair, but I mostly like the Tyler hair. And by that, I mean chest hair. This is his chest. Thank you guys so much for watching. Once again, a huge thank you to Kaylee Melissa for helping me out with my 70s do’s. I’ve linked her channel below, so make sure to go check it out. She’s very talented and she even transformed into Jon Snow one time. If you liked that video, be sure to Sha-mash that LIKE button, and if you want to see more videos like this, make sure to Sha-mash that SUBSCRIBE button. And if you’ve already sha-mashed that SUBSCRIBE button, make sure to also sha-mash that little bell icon in the middle to turn on post notifications, so you get a notification every time that I post. Here are my social media handles and make sure to check out my Nextbeat, I do a lot of daily vlogging and Q&A’s on there. A big shout out to ‘Jam’ for watching. Thanks for watching, Jam. And I will see you guys a-next time. [metal shuffling noises]

100 comments on “I Dressed Like It Was 1977

  1. HELLO FRIENDS!! welcome back to another installment of fashion throughout the decades!! we just have one more before the year is over… what did you think of the 70s outfits?? & sorry for the misspeak! it is *siouxsie sioux from siouxsie and the banshees! <3

  2. can we talk about how she said the first outfit made her feel like she as an investigative reporter and that was her role in escape the night???

  3. I looove the first outfit on her! The hairstyle just really suits her face and makes her look even better than she already does

  4. It also brought us we are the champions wish is iconic

    also in your last look, with that hair you look like robin from HIMYM

  5. The investigative reporter
    ESCAPE THE NIGHT 🥳🥳🥳🥳🥳🥳🥳❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️

  6. I literally had just said to my step sister that 70s punk rock was the 2000s emo look when she said it looked alot like her 2007 emo look.

  7. With the punk movement taking inspiration from 50s fashion, that immediately made me think of the Sex Pistols‘ version of Rock Around The Clock and how much my mom hates it😂

    Me on a road trip with my mom- Can I play Rock Around The Clock on AUX?
    My mom- Sure! I love 50s rock n roll.
    Me- plays Sex Pistols

  8. I agree that the punk outfit is pretty accurate for both the era displayed and today. I would say rather from the neck down, though. Maybe the makeup as well, but not for every day. More likely for special occasion.

  9. What a blast from the past. I lived at the roller rink in 77. I had my own skates that had disco lights in the wheels that flashed as you rolled, I thought I was cool…hehehe Also had a very similar black jumpsuit in 77 but I didn't go punk until 1980. Thanks for the memories I have enjoyed all your fashion through the decades. 💖

  10. That parks and rec reference 😍 and then jam 😂 (Jeremy jam for those who aren’t cool enough to have seen the show 😉)

  11. i always wonder when i watch these types of videos is people's reaction to her outfits lol like our confused or like wtf?

  12. As far as the Farrah hair goes, you made it way more complicated than it was. First you had your hair feathered( which was a pop cut at the time) then all you needed to do was blow dry it with a round brush.

  13. Safiya: it's a good place to showcase me about to fall on my a**.

    Behind them: guy comes out of the ring so fast that he falls into the trash can and knocks it over

    Me:🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣

  14. Safiya: it's a good place to showcase me about to fall on my a**.

    Behind them: guy comes out of the ring so fast that he falls into the trash can and knocks it over

    Me:🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣

  15. In her second outfit bout her hair saf told
    80s are like restoration of England and 70s are like pre revolutionary France
    LOL

  16. Polyester was the late 60's. Not the 70's. And 1970/80 was probably the most sleek, attractive time in history, which is why designers reference it so often.

  17. For the siouxsie hair early eighties, we used shaving cream to lift it and hold it in place. Plus we were wearing lots and lots of chains.

  18. Do you know bibi Blocksberg or Benjamin Blümchen?
    Do you also know Karla Kolumna?
    Well, the first Outfit kinda reminds me of this reporter from my childhood…
    Don't know if these kidsradioplays were popular in the US…

  19. I was 14 in 1977 ………we loved disco, roller skating, and we all had the Farrah feathered hair or Dorothy Hamill bob.!

  20. I want you to mix every eyeshadow from Sephora together because you mix every Beauty gurus eyeshadow together and I feel like it's time you mix every eyeshadow from Sephora together and then you should makes every mascara from Sephora together

  21. I feel like if bakugou #bnhaormha when in the 1977's he would a punk with kirishima cause you know . And rock lee and guy #naruto

  22. I feel like punk was an 80's thing. It may have birthed in 77, if you say so, but it wasnt mainstreem till mid 80's. I lived it thru high school.

  23. In Chav culture everything is a meme. You can buy a Hippy outfit on ebay for a weekend. Doesn't put you into the Peace Movement and the resistance to the draft.

  24. Ok here’s some news. Travolta himself stated that the clothes he wore in SNF were a few years out of style, and when my friends and I saw that movie around Christmas of 1977, we were pretty appalled at the clothes. Didn’t like disco? No we loved it – but we wore jeans tucked into Frye boots, Lacoste polos (huge in summer ‘77), green jackets from the army/navy store, band collared shirts (no 747 collars), and in winter, navy blue bomber jackets with pile collars. The women in our disco crowd wore cowl neck sweaters, dark denim straight leg jeans, below the knee skirts, boots boots and more boots, and often had fairly short hair. (“The wedge”). The coolest store in the world was Fiorucci in N Y, along with Bloomingdales (Sears? Penney’s? No!). Look for the photo of Cher dancing at Studio in 1977 with a guy wearing cotton casual pants and (likely) rubber and canvas short boots ($35 by Chris Craft). THAT was the disco look – not what Hollywood said it was. (Although I do believe the mainstream clubs had dress codes that encouraged the polyester hoopla).

  25. And here’s just one more comment. The disco scene portrayed in the movie Saturday Night Fever and the one in the actual New York disco Studio 54 were VERY different from each other. The latter was more in line with the disco that was integral to the lives of gay men in the 70s, who were the unspoken arbiters of high level pop culture. (And in all honesty a fair amount of not so high level). (And for the music, ditch the BeeGees and try Sun Sun Sun by Ja Kki, From Here to Eternity by Giorgio Moroder, and Get on the Funk Train by Munich Machine).

  26. The similarity she said of this video and 2007 my mum was born in 1977 and I was 2007 and we have the same personality but completely opposite of what u said the energetic cheerfull one

  27. Safiya, I was probably like your mom. I graduated in 1977, Elvis died and I turned 18. I went downtown Minneapolis with my mom and aunt. I had a Farrah Fawcett hairdo and a stylish 3 piece black chambray suit with platforms. As we exited our favorite Italian restaurant I was approached by a dapper man also in a poly 3 piece suit with a wide rim hat and platform shoes. He asked if I'd like to join his stable! My aunt chased him off! I'd say you nailed it!

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